Tag Archives: high-ability

Advanced Learner MTSS Professional Learning Opportunity

The Iowa Department of Education is offering sessions across the state to provide professional learning about the Advanced Learner Multi-tiered System of Support (MTSS) Guide, created to assist classroom teachers who want to ensure all students, including advanced learners, are appropriately challenged in every classroom. The Advanced Learner MTSS Guide is written content neutral and can be used across disciplines for K-12 grade learners.

April 10 Des Moines Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites located at 4800 Merle Hay

April 17 Coralville/Iowa City – Radisson Hotel and Conference Center/Hampton Inn located at 1220 1st Avenue Suite B Coralville, IA

April 20 Sioux City – Hilton Garden Inn Riverfront located at 1132 Larsen Park Road

Districts are encouraged to bring teams comprised of general education elementary classroom teachers, secondary educators, a counselor, teacher leaders, a building administrator, the gifted and talented program coordinator, and gifted and talented program teachers.

For questions about event registration or the PD session itself, contact Rosanne Malek at 515-281-3199 or rosanne.malek@iowa.gov.

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One semester hour of credit available: PSQF:5194:0WKA
(automatic 50% tuition scholarship) 

One semester hour of academic credit may apply to either the Psychology strand or the Programming strand for the State of Iowa Talented and Gifted Endorsement, depending on the student’s choice of readings and project.

You do not have to be a regularly enrolled student at the University of Iowa, nor do you need to apply for admission to the University, in order to register for courses to earn the State of Iowa Talented and Gifted Endorsement. Participants need to register, at no cost, through the Division of Continuing Education:

https://www2.education.uiowa.edu/belinblank/Educators/Courses/registration.aspx 

Questions about this or other credit options available for the TAG Endorsement? Contact Dr. Laurie Croft, Associate Director, Professional Development (laurie-croft@uiowa.edu / 319-335-6148) or Rachelle-Blackwell (rachelle-blackwell@uiowa.edu / 319-335-6148). 

A Visual Guide to Middle School IOAPA Courses

With the introduction of our middle school courses in Fall 2015, many students and teachers may still have questions about the types of courses offered by the Iowa Online AP Academy, who these classes might benefit, and how to select students who will be prepared for and challenged by online coursework.

Based on the information and experiences we have gathered so far, we are excited to provide a visual guide to our middle school classes! These data are based on middle school Iowa Online AP Academy (IOAPA) courses taken during the fall 2015 semester.We hope they will be helpful as you and your students consider plans to register for 2016-17 courses through IOAPA.

If you are looking for more information about IOAPA’s middle school classes, check out our past posts on middle school courses and above-level testing, or visit our website. Make sure to check back here soon for our high school courses recap!

IOAPA Fall 2015 MS Data Infographic

 

Interested in IOAPA? Learn more about registration!

Registration for Iowa Online AP Academy 2016-2017 classes open in just one week (April 19), and many teachers want to register their students promptly to ensure access to these courses. Whether you are new to IOAPA or just need a refresher, take a look at the following handy registration guide for pointers on the registration process!

To register, visit our website (belinblank.org/ioapa). Be sure to read through the Getting Started section for important program information.  You will need to re-register your school each academic year.

When you’re ready to register, take the following steps:

  1. Register your school and assign a site coordinator and mentor. The first step is for principals to register their schools. They can do that on our website (belinblank.org/ioapa) by clicking on Register on the homepage. As part of this step, schools assign a site coordinator and a mentor. They can be the same person or different people; however, the mentor needs to be a certified teacher at the school. We’ll be discussing this difference more in future blog posts.
  2. Nominate the student(s) taking IOAPA course(s). Completing the school registration page sends the principal an automated email with a link in it to nominate the student. The principal either needs to complete the nomination or forward the link to the site coordinator or mentor to complete.
  3. Confirm that the student has self-enrolled in the course. Once the student has been nominated, an email will be automatically sent to the student to enroll himself/herself in the actual course. Be sure to have students check their junk mail folders, as the automated emails sometimes get filtered there. Students should complete this process and be sure to click submit when they’re done.

Middle school students should also take an above-level test to help determine eligibility, with scores considered current within the past two years. (For eligibility guidelines, see Requirements.) Learn more about above-level testing.

Questions? Check out our website (belinblank.org/ioapa) for further assistance!

IOAPA

Summer on the Brain 2014

Our staff are already dreaming of summer. Are you?

Feb14_summer_video

Impacting Gifted Education Worldwide

The Belin-Blank Center’s administrators have some exciting international presentations and workshops coming up – learn more about the places they’re headed to speak about gifted education.

Presentations Map

Philippines

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Click on the image above to enlarge.

Dr. Laurie Croft (Administrator, Professional Development) will be traveling to Quezon City in the National Capital Region of the Philippines at the end of November.

A Templeton Fellow, Dr. Leticia Peñano-Ho, invited Dr. Croft to do a two-day training about differentiation titled “Differentiation: A Whole School Program” in conjunction with the Philippine Center for Gifted Education‘s annual convention.

PCGE expects about 200 educators, but you can learn more about how to join them on their Facebook page.

India

Dr. Croft will also head to New Delhi in the Delhi National Capital Territory in India at the beginning of February.  She is on the planning committee for the 1st International Conference on Research in Education and Curriculum Planning for Gifted Minds (February 4 – 6), and she has also been invited to be a plenary speaker.  This conference has been spearheaded by the Jagadis Bose National Science Talent Search (JBNSTS), which is hoping to host similar events in the future.

While in India, Dr. Croft plans to work with another Templeton Fellow, Dr. Narayan Desai, and his wife, Dr. Devasena Desai (who was a Belin-Blank Fellow three years ago), as they collaborate with Jnana Prabodhini Institute of Psychology at Pune University (Maharashtra State) to launch a professional development program in gifted education.

Portugal

Belin-Blank Center Director Dr. Susan Assouline will be in Portugal November 22-23 as a keynote speaker at the inaugural ANEIS conference in Porto, Portugal.  The conference theme is “Giftedness:  Challenges of teaching and learning in different contexts.”  The title of Dr. Assouline’s talk is “From Gifted Education to Talent Development:  A Global Perspective.”

Australia

In early January, Dr. Assouline will travel to Sydney to participate in the University of New South Wale’s (UNSW) Certificate of Gifted Education Program (COGE), which has been in existence since 1991.  She is looking forward to teaching the opening course, “Key Concepts and Issues in Gifted Education.”

COGE is offered through the UNSW Gifted Education Research, Resource and Information Centre, which has partnered with the Belin-Blank Center since 1995.  A highlight of the partnership is Professor Miraca U.M. Gross’s co-authorship, with Professors Colangelo and Assouline, on A Nation Deceived.

The Netherlands

On November 1st, Director Emeritus Dr. Nicholas Colangelo will present at an international conference organized by the Center for the Study of Giftedness (CBO) and the Behavioural Science Institute of the Radboud University Nijmegen titled “Potential Development and Gifted Education.”

How Can Students Earn College Credit While Still in High School?

Taking college-level coursework while still in high school is an important opportunity for high-achieving high school students who are ready for an extra challenge in high school.  The benefits of college-level coursework include enhanced preparation for college and, in some cases, reduced college tuition costs, because students are able to accumulate college credit free of charge while still in high school.  Many colleges and universities award college credit for such coursework.

At first glance, it might seem like enrolling in community college credit coursework and APTM coursework are two different means to the same end.  In some cases this is true, but in other cases there are subtle differences that are important for students, teachers, parents, and school counselors to know.

Q.     Isn’t college credit the same whether I earn credit through a community college course, or through an APTM course?

A.     Many times students earn college credit from a community college course, if they have earned at least a C- in the course.  Once students graduate from high school and transfer their community college coursework to a post-secondary institution the way the credits transfer is not uniform.  Each post-secondary institution has a community college credit transition guide.  Students should consult the transition guide to see how their community college credit will be applied to graduation requirements at their post-secondary institution.  In some cases coursework may be transferred in as general education credit, in others the credit may count toward a liberal arts core requirement.  Very rarely does the credit transfer in to replace a specific course (unless of course the student is attending the institution granting the concurrent credit in the first place!)

Q.        How do I get college credit for an APTM course?

A.         Post-secondary institutions have policies for accepting APTM test scores to replace required credits for first-year required courses.  Many times, in order to earn college credit from an APTM course, students must score at least 3 on the APTM  exam(some schools have more restrictive requirements).  Students transferring in APTM scores of 3 will find that these scores are applied in much the same way that community college credits are applied to required coursework (general education or liberal arts core credit).  However, an important difference between community college credit and APTM scores is that in some core areas students earning a score of 4 or 5 on an APTM exam can use the score to replace a particular course, instead of being transferred into the institution as general education or liberal arts core credit.

Q.     Isn’t there a lot of pressure to perform well on the APTM test, in order to earn credit at my post-secondary institution?

A.     If your post-secondary institution awards credit for APTM courses, students earn credit based on the exam they take at the end of the course. To enroll in APTM coursework The College Board strongly recommends that students have completed all prerequisite courses, but any student regardless of an exam score can enroll in the course (and thus be exposed to the rigorous curriculum).  Regardless of the APTM exam score at the end of course, the student has been exposed to the expectations and workload of a college course.  Students enrolling in community college courses, with transferable credit must earn a qualifying score (or have a qualifying ACT score) to enroll in the course.  Students who do not earn a qualifying score are not eligible to enroll in the course.  Once students have earned a qualifying score for the community college course they will earn some type of college credit, as long as they maintain the minimum grade requirements for the course.

Check out Iowa Online APTM Academy’s APTM coursework table here:

10-8 BlogKD

Click on the image above to enlarge.

 

Check out the APTM Student post about the role of APTM coursework and getting in to college:

 https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/exploreap/the-rewards

Do You Have a High-Ability Student Looking for a Challenge?

During the fall semester, Challenge Saturdays provides engaging weekend classes for students in Des Moines and Iowa City.

These classes are designed for high-ability elementary- and middle-school-aged students who are current members of the Belin-Blank Exceptional Student Talent Search (BESTS). Students who are not part of BESTS but who are of high ability are also encouraged to attend.*

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In small classes, students receive direct instruction and do advanced work. Students choose one class only. The class meets five times.  Financial assistance is available.

Learn more and register here.

*Students who are not part of BESTS generally register for BESTS – but in the meantime, parents provide a copy of the child’s most-recent ITBS scores. If test data is not available, a teacher recommendation may be submitted. To register a non-BESTS student, first sign up for a class. Following registration, send the above information to Bridget Pauley, 600 Blank Honors Center, Iowa City, IA 52242 or fax it to her attention at 319-335-5151.