Category Archives: Iowa Online AP Academy

IOAPA for Middle School – Advice From Current Mentors

A recent question on the Belin-Blank Center’s email listserv for gifted education teachers sparked a conversation about various success stories and best practices from experienced IOAPA mentors. With their consent, I have gathered that advice into a blog post so more teachers can benefit from their experiences.

Importance of Frequent Face-to-Face Connection
Several mentors indicated the necessity of face-to-face interaction with students to monitor performance and promote progress. Deann Scearce (Mount Vernon Middle School) indicated that her 7th and 8th grade students are scheduled into her classroom every other day for their IOAPA class. IOAPA requires courses to be scheduled as part of students’ regular school day, and recommends that the mentor be available during scheduled work time. Kelley Grothus (Madrid Middle School) schedules her students for 1.5 hours each day (including lunch). She says, “Sometimes we sit together to go through the material or just so they can talk through their quiz prep and have someone listen to them. Through lunch, I make them the teacher and have them explain what they are learning to me.” Marcia Powell (Oelwein Middle School) uses her mentoring time to “have a conversation if [students] are lagging and to encourage them or reward them with smiles, high-fives, or something else.”

In addition, Kelley noted the benefit of developing an online learning community. IOAPA permits schools to register up to 6 students per course, and Kelley uses that to her advantage by offering specific courses each semester (i.e., creative writing one semester, and psychology the next). She reported that “this allows that kids to work together & discuss rather than learn in isolation.” Similarly, Marcia recommends that students “enroll in groups of two or three so they can bounce ideas off of one another.” These opportunities for collaboration with peers, as well as the mentoring component included in the IOAPA model, establish a platform for success in online learning.

shutterstock_361393745

Benefits of the Online Curriculum
Our mentors appreciate the benefits of these self-contained online classes. Michelle Kavars (Lewis Central Middle School) touted the fact that “there is no real need to ‘teach’ lessons as there are videos, exercises, self-checks, and quizzes along the way.” Each course is a little different, and includes different instructional modalities specifically designed to address the course content; however, this mix of videos, readings, assignments, and quizzes is common, and content expertise is not necessary for IOAPA mentors as all the necessary content for our middle school courses is taught by the online instructor. Kelley attested that “the content is well-organized, sequenced, & managed for you, allowing me to expose the students to a variety of content that matches their strengths and interests.”

Significance of Purposeful Planning
IOAPA allows schools to make courses available to students based on their unique needs and interests, when doing so in person would be resource-prohibitive. However, as many of our mentors reported, purposeful planning is key to success in online learning. Kelley strives to give her students “an authentic & personal connection to the online content.” Our other mentors indicated similar efforts to overcome skepticism often associated with online learning through intentionally establishing ways to connect with students.

This planning is also essential when determining what IOAPA courses to make available to students. Taking advantage of courses offered in person, even if at another grade level, is valuable; according to Kelley, “when there is an in-person expert to teach [students], we utilize that.” IOAPA prohibits schools from using our online courses to help with scheduling conflicts; schools are only permitted to offer those courses that are not already available to students through the school. In the case of middle school courses, if transportation or other issues prevent students from accessing an appropriately challenging course within their district, IOAPA courses may be used to address those needs. For example, if an 8th grade student requires geometry, but the course is only available at the high school level, they would be permitted to enroll in the IOAPA Geometry course. We would still recommend prioritizing in-person classes if it is feasible to do so.

shutterstock_183833012.jpg

When offering IOAPA middle school courses, one of the most frequent conversations you’ll have with parents and administrators will concern credit. It will be essential to discuss with middle school and high school administrators how credit will be assigned for IOAPA middle school classes, which are high school level courses offered out-of-level to younger-than-typical students. You can see our previous blog post on this issue. Deann’s school follows a unique credit policy: Students review their final grade and decide if they want to receive high school credit – with the grade they earned going on their high school transcript and affecting their high school GPA.

Finally, planning cannot end with the current school year. Marcia indicated the importance of considering each student’s course progression through high school, and considering alternative courses that could supplement learning in a content area (i.e., offering online computer science or statistics to a math-talented student, in addition to challenging math curriculum), especially if sufficiently advanced courses in the content area are likely to be unavailable later in the student’s academic career.

Conclusion
Overall, our mentors express satisfaction with the IOAPA program, and we know that this program would not be successful without the tireless work they put in each day to support students. If you’re interested in making these classes available to your students, visit belinblank.org/ioapa. Contact ioapa@belinblank.org with questions, and stay tuned to the blog for more advice from students and mentors this summer.

Register for the AP Teacher Training Institute Soon

With summer just around the corner, now is the time to plan your summer professional development. With so many online and on-campus professional development opportunities available at the Belin-Blank Center, you have many options from which to choose!

If your goal this summer is to expand AP opportunities for students in your schools, consider attending the AP Teacher Training Institute (APTTI) on the University of Iowa campus from June 26-29, 2018. With workshops in Calculus AB, Chemistry, English Language & Composition, English Literature & Composition, Physics, U.S. Government & Politics, and U.S. History, there’s sure to be a subject of interest to you and your students.

APTTI US History

The goals of APTTI are to provide the necessary skills and knowledge to implement an AP course in your school. New and experienced teachers alike can benefit from the training provided by our fantastic consultants. AP U.S. Government & Politics teachers should especially consider attending an AP Summer Institute like APTTI this summer, with the upcoming redesign of the course rolling out in 2018-2019. Seats are still available in our AP U.S. Government workshop, but they’re filling up quickly, so register soon!

If you have questions about APTTI, visit belinblank.org/aptti or email aptti@belinblank.org. We can’t wait to see you on the UI campus this summer!

Last-Minute AP Exam Tips

With just over a week until AP Exams begin, high school students across the country are frantically completing their coursework and preparing for the big day. In this blog post, we’ll share a few tips to aid in last-minute studying, as well as some reminders for Exam Day.

Study Tips
A quick internet search of terms including “AP exam,” “study,” “review,” and “tips” yields millions of results. Below are some of the most common tips from AP experts.

  • Use practice questions and exams. The types of questions on the AP Exam may be unfamiliar to you, and knowing the material is not necessarily enough to earn a high score on the exam. The College Board offers practice questions on their website, including actual questions from previous years’ exams, and many test prep books and websites have developed their own practice questions.
    • In addition to using these materials to test your knowledge and familiarity with content and question types, you can set up a “mock exam” experience with timing, breaks, etc. so you’re more comfortable on Exam Day.
  • Review the Course Description document for details about the exam and the evaluation rubric. Each AP Course has its own Course Description; for example, see the AP English Language Course Description. Each Course Description can be accessed from the relevant subject’s Course page. This document also contains additional practice questions!
    • The Exam description within this document can also help you focus your studying — it’s not important that you know every single fact you learned in class; instead, you’ll want to master the topics that are emphasized on the exam. Especially in the Free Response section, exam readers will be looking for synthesis of big concepts rather than just regurgitation of facts.
  • Study selectively. At this point, you definitely don’t have time to review every single topic covered over the course of the year. However, I bet there are topics you feel pretty confident about, as well as areas in which you struggle. For your last-minute studying, focus primarily on those areas of weakness. See this US News article for more tips.

Exam Day Reminders
Just like the ACT or SAT, AP Exams are strictly monitored and there are important rules of which to be aware.

  • Know what you can (and cannot) bring into the exam. Carefully review these lists to make sure you are following the rules. Also check out the calculator policy for relevant courses (including most math and science courses).
  • Review the Bulletin for AP Students and ParentsBefore you can take the AP Exam, you’ll be asked to sign your answer sheet indicating agreement and compliance with the policies and procedures outlined therein. It also gives you an idea of what to expect when you arrive for your exam.
  • Eat a good breakfast! Most exams take two to three hours, and they require mental and physical endurance. Prepare yourself the best way possible by fueling your body and mind.
  • Answer all the multiple-choice questions. You won’t be penalized for incorrect answers, so it is to your benefit to take a guess if you’re not sure on a question. By answering, you give yourself a chance to get it right — usually a one-in-four or better!

You have worked hard over the past year, and now’s your chance to demonstrate what you’ve learned and possibly earn some college credit in the process. Simply taking the AP Exam is a great experience, and if you take advantage of these tips you’ll set yourself up for success!

IOAPA Fall 2018 Registration Now Open

Registration for Fall 2018 Iowa Online AP Academy courses is now open! We are excited to continue to offer above-level courses to high-ability Iowa students at no cost.

Courses are available in a variety of subjects, including science, math, language arts, social studies, computer science, and Spanish language. See our full course catalog for specific availability.

Student-Header-5.jpg

For high school students (grades 9 through 12), 15 unique AP courses are available. These courses use a College Board-approved curriculum that aligns with the material covered in introductory-level college courses. Students have the opportunity to earn college credit for these courses by earning a qualifying score on the end-of-year AP Exam.

Students in grades 6 through 8 have the opportunity to enroll in high school level courses, including Introduction to Computer Science, Creative Writing, Honors Biology, and Honors Spanish I. Also see our previous blog post on the new math courses available for 2018-2019!

Relevant information and policies can be found on our website (www.belinblank.org.ioapa). It is especially important to take note of the eligibility requirements for schools and students, and to review the Getting Started section prior to registering your school and students. In addition, please keep in mind that these courses are intended for students who would have no other way to take them. They are NOT intended to solve scheduling issues at schools who already offer the course(s) of interest.

APTTI Physics 2017-39

If you’re interested in offering on-site AP courses at your school, the AP Teacher Training Institute (APTTI) provides instruction and certification to teach AP courses. This summer’s institute will occur on the University of Iowa campus June 26-29, 2018. We are offering workshops in the following subjects: AP Biology, AP Calculus, AP Chemistry, AP English Language, AP English Literature, AP Physics, AP US Government, and AP US History. Iowa teachers are eligible for a grant to reduce the cost of attending APTTI. With questions about APTTI, contact aptti@belinblank.org.

For additional information about IOAPA, stay tuned to the blog and follow us on Twitter @belinblankIOAPA. With questions, contact ioapa@belinblank.org.

Encouraging Students to Take AP Exams

Around this time of year, AP teachers across the country frequently hear the following question: “Why should I take the AP Exam?” This blog post will provide some responses to that question, and some tips for AP teachers to encourage their students to take AP Exams.

Why Should Students Take The Exam?
First off, AP Exams are the only way to earn college credit for AP courses. This can be a strong motivation for students, as one of the advantages of AP courses is that they provide opportunities to earn college credit while in high school, and achieve ‘advanced placement’ upon entering college.

Second, the experience of taking AP exams is beneficial for students even beyond the exposure to advanced material presented in the course. One study found that students who took one or more AP Exams were more likely to enroll in college than students who did not take any AP exams (Chajewski, Mattern, & Shaw, 2011). Students who took both an AP course and exam outperformed students who took an AP course only with regard to both college achievement and graduation (Hargrove, Godin, & Dodd, 2008). Research findings generally suggest that AP course participation yields benefits beyond non-AP courses, and that AP Exam participation compounds those benefits.

Finally, the AP Exams are a socially appropriate way of “showing off” what you’ve learned, and students who participate and succeed on a high number of AP Exams can earn recognition in addition to college credit. There are several opportunities to earn special recognition, and they are detailed on the AP Awards and Recognition page of the AP Students website.

pexels-photo-306534.jpeg

How Can Teachers Encourage Students Who Are On The Fence?
A personal conversation with students about their goals for taking AP coursework is a good first step. If their goal is to earn credit for college, they must take the exam in order to achieve it. If they entered the class with a different goal, the AP Exam may or may not be necessary. In general, it is recommended that all students who complete an AP course take the corresponding exam.

Some students may be worried about underperforming on the AP Exam. Mentors can discuss these concerns with students and reassure them that tthere is no penalty associated with low AP Exam scores. The exam is separate from the course grade, so course grades will not be negatively impacted by a low AP Exam score, and low scores will not have an impact on college admission decisions. Students can also control how and to whom their AP Exam scores are reported if they are concerned about college admissions.

Some students may be worried that they won’t be prepared for the AP Exam. There are a lot of great resources available to determine readiness for AP Exams. The College Board provides sample questions on their website and many independent publishers offer books aimed at helping with AP Exam preparation. Making these tools available is an excellent way to help students feel prepared and motivated to take the AP Exam.

What Else Should We Know?
For information on 2018 AP Exam dates, ordering, and other details, review our previous blog post. You can also visit the College Board website for relevant school preparation and Exam Day information. As always, feel free to contact ioapa@belinblank.org with questions, and stay tuned to our blog for more AP Exam tips!

References
Chajewski, M., Mattern, K. D., & Shaw, E.J. (2011). Examining the role of Advanced Placement Exam participation in four-year college enrollment. Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, 30(4), 16-27.
Hargrove, L., Godin, D., & Dodd, B. (2008). College outcomes comparisons by AP and non-AP high school experiences. (College Board Research Report No. 2008-3). New York: The College Board. Retrieved from: http://research.collegeboard.org/rr2008-3.pdf.

AP Exam Reviews Through IOAPA

UPDATE: All of our AP Exam Reviews have now been spoken for. As mentioned below, we had an extremely limited number this year, due to increased enrollments in courses. If schools and/or families would like to purchase the reviews on their own, directly from Apex Learning, we would be happy to send you information about that. Contact ioapa@belinblank.org.


The Iowa Online AP Academy is pleased to announce that the AP Online Exam Review will again be available to all Iowa AP students and teachers. Students in IOAPA AP classes are automatically set up, and students in your on-site AP classes are eligible to sign up for AP Exam Review.

AP Exam Review is available through Apex Learning for the following 13 AP courses: AP Biology, AP Calculus AB, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP English Language and Composition, AP English Literature and Composition, AP Macroeconomics, AP Microeconomics, AP Psychology, AP Spanish Language and Culture, AP Statistics, AP U.S. Government and Politics, and AP U.S. History.

shutterstock_341409845

Significantly fewer AP Exam Reviews are available this year than in years past, due to extremely high interest in our ever-expanding course offerings. In light of these limitations, we ask that schools carefully consider their students’ need for and interest in this modality of support before signing students up for AP Exam Review through Apex. Please make this opportunity available to students who will make use of the support, and especially to students who may lack access to other resources.

The process for schools to register students for AP Exam Review differs from the registration for online AP courses. Please read the following instructions carefully. If you have questions about signing students up for AP Exam Review, you can contact Lori Hudson at ioapa@belinblank.org, 1-800-336-6463, or 319-335-6148.

There are two ways for schools to set up users.

Option 1:
The first option is for the Site Coordinator to create a Classroom through their IOAPA account (use the Classroom Tab). Site Coordinators may then add students to each AP Exam Review subject class they create. To add or edit a Classroom for AP Exam Review, please sign in to http://ioapa.apexvs.com/ApexUI/ and click on the Classroom tab. The Exam Review should be the only class showing. Click on the “Add a Classroom” button on the right and follow the prompts to add the class, select the exam review content, and add students. Add a classroom for each Exam Review content area you want to access.

Do not enroll mentors through this Classroom tab; instead, add them as staff in the Staff Tab. They can then select the Exam Review areas they need.

Option 2, to be used if you will be enrolling 25 or more students:
The second option is for the school to send a completed Excel file (contact ioapa@belinblank.org for template) to Support at Apex Learning. Apex Learning Support staff will register the students for your school if you have more than 25 students per review. Given the limited number of AP Exam Reviews available this year, this option will be very rarely needed.

Option 2 Instructions: List each student on a single line. Indicate which AP Exam Review course(s) by product code the student should be enrolled in. Product codes are listed in the Product Code tab on the bottom of the AP Exam Review File form. If a student wants to be in multiple exam review, list each course on the single line and separate each course product code with a comma. If you have more than 25 users to enroll, please contact the Apex Learning Support team for information on bulk registration/enrollment. Please attach your completed Excel file to an email addressed to support@apexlearning.com. Use the email subject line: IOAPA – {Your School Name} AP Exam Review Student List.

We’re excited to make this resource available to Iowa students! Contact us at ioapa@belinblank.org with any questions.

Expanding IOAPA’s Above-Level Math Pathway

We at the Iowa Online AP Academy are excited to announce the addition of two new courses for the 2018-2019 school year!

Both courses expand the existing above-level math pathway, allowing students to access additional high school math courses during middle school. Our current offerings, Algebra I (Honors) and Geometry (Honors), can now be followed by Algebra II (Honors) and Precalculus (Honors). All courses in this sequence are available for students in grades 6 through 8 who do not have access to a comparable in-person course.

Algebra II (Honors) builds on the concepts addressed in Algebra I, and develops skills necessary for future advanced math courses. Due to the reliance on Algebra I concepts, students are strongly encouraged to complete an Algebra I course or demonstrate mastery of Algebra I concepts prior to enrolling in Algebra II.

Precalculus (Honors) introduces students to concepts that integrate their previous learning with new skills to prepare students for Calculus and beyond. Prior to enrolling in Precalculus, students should successfully complete Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry or demonstrate mastery of relevant concepts.

There are a number of ways in which schools and students can choose to handle the sequencing of these courses.

Course sequence.jpg

When planning advanced course sequences for students, it is important to consider what comes before and after the main sequence. For example, if bright students have access to Algebra in 6th grade, might they also have access to Pre-Algebra during 5th grade? Additionally, if students are completing a number of high school math courses during middle school, what math courses will they take in high school? Will the courses taken in middle school count toward high school graduation requirements? If not, how will students have access to sufficient math coursework to meet those requirements once they reach high school? Planning is essential to ensure that high ability students continue to learn new things throughout their educational careers.

Registration for fall courses opens the week of March 19. Stay tuned to the blog, our website, and our Twitter for updates. Don’t forget to get started with above-level testing for middle school course eligibility. As always, contact us with questions at ioapa@belinblank.org.